Hallstatt

hallstatt

Why is it called Hallstatt?

It is named for its type site, Hallstatt, a lakeside village in the Austrian Salzkammergut southeast of Salzburg, where there was a rich salt mine, and some 1,300 burials are known, many with fine artefacts.

What is Hallstatt period D?

It is named for its type site, Hallstatt, a lakeside village in the Austrian Salzkammergut southeast of Salzburg, where there was a rich salt mine, and some 1,300 burials are known, many with fine artifacts. Material from Hallstatt has been classified into 4 periods, designated Hallstatt A to D.

What happened in the Hallstatt period?

Hallstatt A–B (1200–800 BC) are part of the Bronze Age Urnfield culture. In this period, people were cremated and buried in simple graves. In phase B, tumulus (barrow or kurgan) burial becomes common, and cremation predominates. The Hallstatt period proper is restricted to HaC and HaD (800–450 BC), corresponding to the early European Iron Age.

What is Hallstatt Salzkammergut?

Hallstatt/Dachstein Salzkammergut is one of just 20 UNESCO World Heritage Sites around the world that are renowned for their natural and cultural heritage at the same time The history of salt mining in the World Heritage Community gave its name to the Hallstatt Age (800 to 450 BC). The term „Hal (l)“ („salt“) dates back to the Celts

What is the origin of the word “Hallstatt”?

Note: Archaeological excavations of a nearby burial site which was discovered in 1846 yielded some human bodies and artifacts dating from the late Bronze Age and the early Iron Age. The Hallstatt culture of central and western Europe which is represented by the artifacts takes its name from the village. “Hallstatt.”

Where did the Hallstatt culture begin and end?

At the end of the Urnfield stage of the Late Bronze Age, ca. 800 BC, the central Europeans were mostly farmers (herding and growing crops). The Hallstatt culture included an area between central France to western Hungary and from the Alps to central Poland.

Where is Hallstatt D?

Hallstatt lies in the area where the western and eastern zones of the Hallstatt culture meet, which is reflected in the finds from there. Hallstatt D is succeeded by the La Tène culture .

What is the significance of the Hallstatt cemetery?

The community at Hallstatt exploited the salt mines in the area, which had been worked from time to time since the Neolithic period, from the 8th to 5th centuries BC. The style and decoration of the grave goods found in the cemetery are very distinctive, and artifacts made in this style are widespread in Europe.

When did the Hallstatt period start and end?

The Hallstatt period proper is restricted to HaC and HaD (800–450 BC), corresponding to the early European Iron Age. Hallstatt lies in the area where the western and eastern zones of the Hallstatt culture meet, which is reflected in the finds from there.

What happened at Hallstatt in the Bronze Age?

Finds at Hallstatt extend from about 1200 BC until around 500 BC, and are divided by archaeologists into four phases: Hallstatt A–B (1200–800 BC) are part of the Bronze Age Urnfield culture. In this period, people were cremated and buried in simple graves. In phase B, tumulus (barrow or kurgan) burial becomes common, and cremation predominates.

What was life like at Hallstatt?

The community at Hallstatt was untypical of the wider, mainly agricultural, culture, as its booming economy exploited the salt mines in the area. These had been worked from time to time since the Neolithic period, and in this period were extensively mined with a peak from the 8th to 5th centuries BC.

What are the characteristics of Phase B of the Hallstatt period?

In phase B, tumulus (barrow or kurgan) burial becomes common, and cremation predominates. The Hallstatt period proper is restricted to HaC and HaD (800–450 BC), corresponding to the early European Iron Age. Hallstatt lies in the area where the western and eastern zones of the Hallstatt culture meet,...

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